Kokedama is the Japanese art of growing plants in a moss-covered ball of soil It is wrapped with string and contains an ornamental plant growing inside These beautiful and decorative plants brings an organic and natural touch to planting orchids succulents and Kokedama is a centuries old form of Japanese garden art that has been gaining great popularity in the western world for its beauty Kokedama means Moss Ball in Japanese (Koke=Moss Dama=Ball) It is also known as "Poor Man Bonsai" or " String Garden" As the

DIY Kokedama

Dec 14 2015DIY Kokedama By Krissie Nagy | December 14 2015 Kokedama (Japanese for moss ball) is a style of potting up plants in a ball of moss and displaying them in a dish or suspended in the air The style comes from a centuries-old tradition of exhibiting the exposed root ball of a bonsai specimen on a plate to highlight its elegant root system

Apr 02 2019Kokedama translates to moss-ball in Japanese koke- meaning "moss" and dama- meaning "ball" A kokedama is a living plant in its own ball of soil wrapped in moss and held together with string A typical house plant is transformed into a sculptured art form and display piece Kokedama History The Japanese have always had a deep-rooted

Kokedama is the Japanese art of growing plants in moss balls Traditionally Kokedama is formed by wrapping the roots of plants in clay before tying moss around it The result is a beautiful but high maintenance look Here we show you how to create an easy low maintenance version from old tennis balls and sheet moss All the beauty of Kokedama moss balls without the mess

Based on the ancient Japanese art Kokedama or "moss ball" gardens are becoming a new trend in indoor gardening In this DIY Kokedama tutorial you'll learn how to create a Japanese moss ball that can be suspended in mid-air by string

Jul 01 2019Those who are looking for something a bit more unique and fun might be intrigued by the idea of Kokedama or Japanese moss ball planters This art form makes an interesting gift or a lovely conversation starter in your own home Essentially Kokedama utilizes a moss ball as the base for a plant rather than a pot or a vase

Kokedama Balls Japanese String Garden DIY

Kokedama Balls Video Tutorial The best place to start when it comes to making Kokedama Balls is with a video Better Homes and Garden show you a full tutorial on potting Kokedama Balls with moss You can use ferns bonsai or any type of houseplant when making yours Click Play above to watch now ^

Mar 04 2020Japanese moss balls known as Kokedama are hot right now No pot required — the ancient Japanese art form is a way to display a plant where the exposed round root ball is the focal point Hang it mount one on the wall or create

Enter Kokedama This traditional Japanese art form encloses a plant's roots in moss to retain moisture Kokedama literally mean "moss ball " The style originated from the Nearai and Kusamono bonsai styles and today this design goes one step further when the moss balls are suspended with string

Kokedama is the Japanese art of growing plants in a moss-covered ball of soil wrapped with string or mono-filament fishing line They can be displayed on a decorative surface or hung by string in a window Following is a step-by-step guide on how to create and care for your own kokedama

Dec 09 2019Kokedama is derived fro Japanese language which means moss ball This is ancient Japanese planting technique that becoming popular nowadays This planting method is so unique where you planting the flowers inside a ball The steps in making kokedama is quite simple where you can involve your kids or other families to have fun activities

Kokedama originated from Japan where bonsai plants were grown in moss-covered spherical balls made of soil Loosely translated 'koke' means moss and 'dama' means ball The original Japanese form of kokedama had miniature sculptured trees displayed on an altar-like platform or artistic pieces of driftwood Today kokedama in its modern form has taken over parts of the

Kokedama "Japanese Moss Ball" Instructions Materials Needed: • Soil • Perlite deteriorate over time) • Peat Moss • • Sheet Moss •(regular moss is fine but sheets stay together and make it so easy when wrapping) • Nylon String (or a type that won't Bucket Scissors • Spray Bottle • Plant(s) (shade loving drought hardy

Apr 02 2019Kokedama translates to moss-ball in Japanese koke- meaning "moss" and dama- meaning "ball" A kokedama is a living plant in its own ball of soil wrapped in moss and held together with string A typical house plant is transformed into a sculptured art form and display piece Kokedama History The Japanese have always had a deep-rooted

Kokedamas – tablespoon of earth

In the Japanese language kokedama translates to moss-ball koke- meaning "moss" and dama- meaning "ball" A kokedama is a living organic plant sculpture suspended in its own ball of soil wrapped in moss and held together with string This transforms the plant into a sculptured art form and display piece Combining nature and art is

Enter Kokedama This traditional Japanese art form encloses a plant's roots in moss to retain moisture Kokedama literally mean "moss ball " The style originated from the Nearai and Kusamono bonsai styles and today this design goes one step further when the moss balls are suspended with string

Enter Kokedama This traditional Japanese art form encloses a plant's roots in moss to retain moisture Kokedama literally mean "moss ball " The style originated from the Nearai and Kusamono bonsai styles and today this design goes one step further when the moss balls are suspended with string

Moss and humidity: The moss is the common denominator of all kokedama To live and grow it requires a high and regular water intake moisture Needless to say that the humidity in a home is not at all adapted to the culture of the moss (and fortunately for our interiors) We must therefore increase locally available moisture for the moss ball

Second I recommend placing a wiffle ball or a styrofoam ball in the center of the kokedama This keeps the center of the kokedama dry If the entire kokedama ball was composed of sphagnum moss the center would have a very hard time drying out A continuously wet moss ball results in dead rotten roots in the center of the kokedama